Career Management

So you’ve been applying for jobs for a few weeks (maybe months) and after a successful interview you’ve finally been given the all-elusive job offer. It should all the plain sailing from there, right?

Except that’s not quite the case for most! In fact, for most people, the job offer is only the start to the questions, preparations and worry. And so here we go:

1) “Holy moly I got the job!?”

This is the moment of elation which immediately follows the job offer. You’re beyond happy, you’re probably dancing around your living room and you’re smiling so much it looks like someone has drawn it on with permanent marker!

At this point in the process, remember how lucky you are and start telling people close to you so they can share your happiness too. Don’t boast though, and be careful who you share your news with!

If you’re a recent graduate and have lots of friends who have also been struggling to get hired, then keeping it to yourself for a few days might be a nice idea.

2) “Wait, am I sure this is the right job for me?”

For most of us, we do go through a period of doubt shortly after we’re offered a job. The chances are you’ve been interviewing for a few jobs – and there is always one you’d prefer to get more than the others. If it was your preference you got the offer from, you’re bound to feel a bit doubtful that you might be saying yes just because of the ‘pressure’ to be employed.

But, remember this is just a momentary doubt. Whenever you start to feel like this, remember that great feeling you had when you first got given the job offer – and hopefully the negative emotions will subside and disappear into the background.

If you do start your job and feel like it isn’t the right fit – don’t panic as most employers will have offered you a probation period in the contract somewhere.

3) “Am I sure I can do this job?”

Again this self-doubt is just to protect yourself from going in unarmed on your first day! The last thing you want to do is seem unintelligent, inexperienced or unprepared, so making sure you’ve read up on the company and on the industry is something you can do to keep these feelings at bay.

Stop doubting yourself, and don’t let any self-doubts get in the way of enjoying your success. Keep reminding yourself that you got the job because of how well you did in your interview and the belief the employer had in your abilities and skills. This should make you feel confident and inspired to start – not intimidated or wary.

Do some reading and research if you still feel nervous, and then go in with your head held high, ready to show them what you can do.

4) “Will I get on with my colleagues?”

The chances are, now you’ve been offered a job role, that your employer sees you fitting well within the company. Employers don’t just look for skills and experience when they hire candidates, they also look for personality traits too – which ensures you’ll fit well into the team and be able to work well in the office.

If when you start, you feel like you aren’t settling in well with other colleagues, then mention in to your line manager. Usually stuff like that is just paranoia from being the ‘newbie’ so try not to let it bother you too much.

RELATED: Which Type of Office Worker are You?

5) “Will I have to relocate?”

This will usually have been discussed before they made the offer to you (as it’s such a big decision and life change) but if they offer you the job and then ask you to relocate – this may be something you need to talk to the HR department about.

If you’re happy moving then it might be an exciting opportunity for you to embrace and lead to a new exciting adventure in your life. But, say you’re not ready to relocate; this needs to be said to your employer as soon as possible. Make it clear that although you’re excited to start work and you’re feeling encouraged about the company and about the role – you’re not in a place personally to relocate to another city. Most employers will understand this and try to make something else possible.

6) “What will my boss be like?”

This is something you’ll find out pretty swiftly once you’ve started, and something you can’t do much about until that time rolls around. Don’t worry yourself too much with this, just make sure you aim to impress when you turn up on your first day. Be friendly, enthusiastic and willing to muck in wherever possible, and it’ll be hard for someone not to like you, you’re bound to make a good impression.

Author: Sean Revell from www.leisurejobs.com helps employers find the right candidates and applicants find the right jobs within the leisure industry.


About Guest Author

This post is written by a guest author. If you are interested in submitting a guest post, check out our Guest Post Guidelines - we look forward to hearing from you!

Get weekly recruiting and career tips direct to your inbox!

Load Comments